World Osprey Week

World Osprey Week

Osprey Pandion Haliaetus Rutland Water summer - David Tipling/2020VISION

World Osprey Week - 23-27th March

World Osprey Week or WOW! celebrates the return of the ospreys as they migrate north back to their summer breeding sites. These spectacular birds of prey are an excellent way of engaging young people with a love of wildlife and inspire them using creative, social, and scientific areas of education. 

This year for the first time we are introducing Osprey Home School! Our Osprey Education team have created fun activities for each day of the week that the whole family can get involved with from home.

World Osprey Week at home activities

Follow along with the daily activities below during World Osprey Week. Learn everything there is to know about Ospreys and become an Osprey expert! 

Monday

Watching Ospreys via the Nest Camera

Scientists learn lots about animals by watching them. You can watch our star pair 'Maya' and '33' on the Rutland Ospreys webcam. It is on all the time and you can watch for as long as you wish, but do remember to take a break now and then. 'Maya' and '33' take a break from the nest by going for a fly around, just like you can run around the garden.

If you enjoy your Osprey watching it is something you can do every day if you wish, much better than the TV! If lots of people watch the Ospreys and record their activities someone may spot something important happening which we miss. This is called citizen science. 

Here are some resources to help you:

Primary Schools: Watching Ospreys (Science)
Teacher Notes

Secondary Schools: Watching Ospreys (Science)
Teacher Notes

Tuesday

Drawing or Painting  
You have now spent some time looking at Ospreys so you know what they look like. Today you can get out paper, pencils, crayons or paints and either draw or paint an Osprey picture. It can be any style that you like, colour or black and white, lifelike or cartoon. Just use your imagination. If you put on the webcam you can draw an Osprey from real life. You could also try to show an Osprey activity you have seen on the nest camera, such as bringing in nest material or a fish.

Keep your picture, and later when you return to school you could take it in with you. If lots of people in your class did this then suggest to your teacher that they could judge the best one and send it to us. If we get lots of pictures sent in we will hold a competition.

We've got some Osprey pictures and outlines to get you started:  

Download here

Wednesday

Migration
To get to Africa the Ospreys flew around 3000 miles. They are now back or are in the process of flying back, so that is a return journey of around 6000 miles depending on which country they went to! You can look up the migration route of Osprey 30 (she has a satellite tracker) here. Find out the names of the countries she flies over and draw a map to show her route with all of the countries named.

Here are some resources to help you:

Migration - the amazing migration of Osprey 30 (English & other subjects)
Teacher Notes
Student Notes

Migration Statistics - Osprey 30 (Maths & Science)
Teacher Notes
Student Notes

Osprey Migration (Geography)
Teacher Notes
Student Notes

Space Age Ospreys (Science & Technology)
Teacher Notes

Thursday

Osprey Story
What adventures did the Ospreys have while they were in Africa? Yesterday you learned the countries they fly over whilst migrating, what adventures might they have had, what problems to overcome? Today it is a chance for you to use your imagination.

Write a story about an Osprey in Africa, or on its migration back to Rutland. You can choose a real bird like 33,  30 or 5N. Or you can make one up (but remember to give it a ring number).

To help write your story, visit this page to learn more about the Rutland Ospreys.

Here are some resources to help you:

Stick Puppet Stories (Storytelling)
Teacher Notes

Osprey Story (Multi-subject)
Teacher Notes
Supporting Images

Writing Styles (English)
Teacher Notes

Ospreys in the News (English)
Teacher Notes
Student Notes

Osprey Metaphor (English)
Teacher Notes

Friday

Watching Out of the Window
Wherever you live you can see birds (possibly even a passing Osprey!) You just have to look. This can be done out of the window or outside in your back garden. Get a notebook and pencil find somewhere comfortable and safe, sit and look. Be quiet and if you are outside be still as you can. Look up and all around, gradually you will see the birds. 

Try to see sizes, colours, patterns and shapes, and gradually you will see that there are many different species of bird. If you know their names write a list in your notebook, if you do not know what they are write or sketch some notes which can help you to look them up on the internet later. It is hard at first but gradually you will learn their names. Keep an overall list of what you see.

Keeping a list of birds you see around your home is called ‘patchwatching’ and lots of birders do it.

Here is a challenge …..

How many species of bird can you see on your patch this year. Last year Jackie from the Osprey Education team saw 104 on her patch, which was just in her garden and places she could walk to from the garden! She is determined to beat last year’s total in 2020! Is there someone out there who can beat Jackie’s total? Send us your list!

World Osprey Week continued...

Migration Continued

Migration

The bird world is on the move, migration is a big and exciting event. Here is how you can learn more.

At the moment all the ospreys of breeding age are migrating back to their breeding territories. Several adult ospreys have already arrived at Rutland Water. Ospreys are not the only birds that migrate, last week the chiffchaffs arrived back in the UK, they over winter in West Africa just like the ospreys, but they are very different. Small olive green birds, they are hard to see but at present are in lots of trees and bushes all over the UK. They are easy to hear as they sing their name very loudly Chiff - Chaff over and over again.

Sand martins will be arriving back any day now and at the same time many birds, such as fieldfares, which have spent the winter with us in the UK will be leaving to fly north to breed in Scandinavia or the Artic.

Getting started

Search for a map of the world on the internet and print it out. If you are unable to print, try drawing one and colouring in the main countries. If you do it really big, perhaps on the back of some spare wrapping paper or wall paper, you could make a migration poster.

Completing your migration map

Draw an arrow on your map from Gambia in West Africa to the UK. You could look up the route that ospreys fly on their migration and draw your arrow along the same route. Now write Osprey onto your arrow.

You can show the migration routes of lots of other birds on your map by drawing arrows and writing their names on the arrows. Use the internet to find out where some other migrating birds fly.

If you get stuck try looking up Swallow, Bewick’s Swan, Whooper Swan and Fieldfare, use our wildlife explorer for a starting point. Ospreys also migrate in the USA; look them up to find out where do the American birds overwinter, and where they breed.

If you want some more activities on migration, have a go at Wednesday's activity. 

Birdsong

At this time of the year many birds are starting to sing and call. They call to each other to maintain contact (just like you calling someone on the phone) and they sing to say ‘this is my territory’. There are also alarm calls which they make when they are scared. Visit the RSPB website for more information about bird songs.

You can hear lots of bird songs and calls on the internet. The British Bird Songs website has all of the British Birds songs. If you have a smart phone or tablet, try downloading the Warblr app which recognises British birds by their song.

Begin by using  the internet to hear the song of some easy and common birds such as:

  • blackbird
  • robin
  • wood pigeon
  • wren

Once you have an idea what these common birds sound like try listening for them near your home; outside in the garden or nearby park, or if you are indoors open a window and listen. If you keep still the birds will get used to you and be more likely to sing or call. Ignore the man made sounds like cars, just sit and listen to what birds you can hear. Keep practising and soon you will begin to hear a large variety of birds and begin to recognise them.

Enjoy your listening it is a very relaxing thing to do!

Fun bird maths

In week 1 you started looking at the birds in your garden, park or local fields. By now you will be getting good at recognising them and it is time to make your study more scientific.

Getting started…

First make a list of the names of the birds you have seen last week. (Leave space for extras at the bottom)

Dress up warm to go outside, or get a comfortable place by your window looking outside.

Sit and watch for an hour.

For each bird on your list count how many you see at the same time and write the number on the list you have made. Only write down the largest number that you can see at one time. For example if you can see 3 blackbirds at the same time then record 3. If you see another blackbird later you cannot count your total as 4 because it might be one of your original birds come back.

What to do with your results…

Then it is time to write up your results like a proper scientist.

1. First make a table and put in your results. Your table should have two columns, one for the bird names and one for the number seen. Give your columns proper headings, then transfer all of your rough results into the table. Give your table a heading and write the date, place and time of your study.

 (You could do this on a computer if you have one)

2. Now display your results as a chart (A bar graph or pie chart). You may need some help to do this.

Your bar chart should have bird numbers up the side (y axis) and names along the bottom (x axis). Label your axes properly. Give your bar chart a title which includes the time, place and date of your study.

You can repeat this study and record, several times over the next few weeks. You could try changing the time of day when you do your bird count. This is what a proper scientist would do. It will give a real insight into the birds in your study area and you will be able to see if they change over the spring and summer.

Show your study to your teacher when you get back to school, or send it in an email it to us at info@lrwt.org.uk. If we get enough we could have a competition.

Have a go at these other maths activities so you can really improve your maths skills:

Osprey Dice Game
Teacher Notes
Infosheet

Migration Statistics - Osprey 30
Teacher Notes
Student Notes

Patterns & Trends
Teacher Notes
Student Notes
Worksheet

Osprey Fishing Data 
Teacher Notes
Student Notes
Worksheet

Ospreyrobics

After all that studying you will need some exercise! Have a go at these fun osprey related exercises for all ages!

Ospreyrobics 
Teacher Notes

Osprey flying over water

WildNet - Andrew Mason

Watch and listen

Songs and Videos

We've pulled together our favourite songs and videos about ospreys, some of which have been sent in by schools that we work with, some by individuals, and some clips are taken straight from our webcam. They make a great starting point for teaching or learning resource.

Discover more

Free World Osprey Week educational resources and activities

Schools, educational groups and home school groups can have free access to a huge range of osprey related educational resources, puzzles and games. The resources are divided into Primary and Secondary age groups on the website and cover almost every subject area of the curriculum. These can be used or adapted and cover a wide range of subjects depending on interest or ability. These include pupil activity sheets, teacher’s notes, resources sheets, lesson plans and even a one week curriculum plan for Primary Schools. including subject specific and many cross curricular themes. Be inspired in your teaching in World Osprey Week!

Free Primary School Resources

The resources are designed so that schools and teachers can dip into the materials, ideas and lesson plans as much as they wish to. However for total immersion for your pupils there should be enough material for a class to do osprey related work (across all subjects) for at least two hours every day for a week.

Ospreys in Verse (English)
Teacher Notes

Stick Puppet Stories (Storytelling)
Teacher Notes

Watching Ospreys (Science)
Teacher Notes

Classroom Migration Project (Multi-subject)
Teacher Notes
Supporting Images

Ospreyrobics (Physical Education)
Teacher Notes

Osprey Story (Multi-subject)
Teacher Notes
Supporting Images

Osprey Key Ring or Bag Charm (Art and design)
Worksheet

Osprey Leg Ring (Multi-subject)
Teacher Notes

Osprey Words (Puzzles)
Teacher Notes

Osprey Dice Game (Maths)
Teacher Notes
Infosheet

Osprey Fishing (Game)
Teacher Notes
Student Notes
Worksheet

Water Cycle (Science)
Teacher Notes
Student Notes

A Fishy Puzzle (Puzzle)
Worksheet

Musical Ospreys (Music)
Teacher Notes

Survival of the Fittest (Game)
Teacher Notes
Worksheet

Free Secondary School Resources

There is a large breadth of subjects covered in a secondary school curriculum but we have enough diversity of Osprey-related materials for every teacher to join in WOW with their pupils. The following list includes topics for which there are teacher notes, lesson plans or worksheets which can be used.

Ospreys in Verse (English)
Teacher Notes

Writing Styles (English)
Teacher Notes

Ospreys in the News (English)
Teacher Notes
Student Notes

Osprey Behaviour (Science)
Teacher Notes
Student Notes

Migration - the amazing migration of Osprey 30 (English & other subjects)
Teacher Notes
Student Notes

Migration Statistics - Osprey 30 (Maths & Science)
Teacher Notes
Student Notes

Data Handling (Maths & Science)
Teacher Notes
Student Notes

Osprey Key Chain or Charm (Art & Design)
Teacher Notes

Space Age Ospreys (Science & Technology)
Teacher Notes

Designed to be an Osprey (Science)
Worksheet
Incubation Investigation (Science)
Teacher Notes
Student Notes

Osprey Metaphor (English)
Teacher Notes

Osprey Art (Art)
Teacher Notes
Infosheet

Ospreys & Business Studies (Business & PSHE)
Teacher Notes

Patterns & Trends (Maths)
Teacher Notes
Student Notes
Worksheet

Should We Re-introduce Ospreys? (Multi-subject)
Teacher Notes
Student Notes

Osprey Migration (Geography)
Teacher Notes
Student Notes

Historical Ospreys (History)
Teacher Notes

What does a Scientist look like? (Careers)
Teacher Notes
Student Notes
Extra Photo

Osprey Words (Puzzles)
Worksheet

Osprey Dice Game
Teacher Notes
Infosheet

Inheritance (Biology)
Teacher Notes
Student Notes
Worksheet

Osprey Fishing Game (Games)
Teacher Notes
Student Notes
Infosheet

Family Trees (Science)
Teacher Notes
Student Notes
Worksheet

A Fishy Puzzle (Games)
Worksheet

Survival of the Fittest (Science)
Teacher Notes
Teacher Notes II
Student Notes
Worksheet

Musical Ospreys (Music)
Teacher Notes

Relationships & Interactions (Science)
Teacher Notes
Student Notes

Osprey Fishing Data (Science)
Teacher Notes
Student Notes
Worksheet

Multicultural Ospreys (Multi-subject)
Teacher Notes
Teacher Notes II
Student Notes
Student Notes II

Osprey Food (Food Technology & Science)
Teacher Notes (Science)
Teacher Notes (Food Tech)

Food Webs (Science)
Teacher Notes
Worksheet
Infosheet

Food Chains (Science)
Teacher Notes
Worksheet
Puzzles