Narborough Bog is a unique reserve for Leicestershire and Rutland just a few miles south of the city. Over 6,000 years old, it’s no wonder that this reserve is such a hotbed for wildlife in suburbia, with habitats including fen meadow, wet woodland and reedbed. Over 130 bird species have been recorded here, including kingfishers, tawny owls and all three species of woodpecker!

Location

Leicester Road, Narborough
LE19 2AZ

OS Map Reference

SP 547978 (Sheet 140)
A static map of Narborough Bog

Know before you go

Size
9 hectares

Entry fee

Free

Parking information

Park near the club-house and walk across the recreation ground to the reserve entrance

Grazing animals

Livestock may be present

Access

The reserve lies between the River Soar and the M1 motorway, 8 km south of Leicester. From the city, head south past Fosse Park shopping centre on the B4114. Turn left off the road immediately before going under the motorway and drive down the track to the sports club. Park near the club-house and walk across the recreation ground to the reserve entrance, which is just where the allotments and the nature reserve meet. There is a kissing gate and stiles.

Dogs

On a lead

When to visit

Opening times

Always open

Best time to visit

Summer

About the reserve

Narborough Bog is a unique reserve for Leicestershire and Rutland: a proper peat bog, just a few miles south of the city. Over 6,000 years old, it’s no wonder that this reserve is such a hotbed for wildlife in suburbia. Over 130 bird species have been recorded here, including kingfishers, tawny owls and all three species of woodpecker! If you’re looking escape the hustle and bustle of city life for an hour or two, and really immerse yourself in a diverse and interesting habitat teeming with nature, this is the reserve for you.

A wander around these varied habitats is sure to delight. The diverse woodland is made up of a variety of tree species, crack-willow, alder, birch, pedunculate oak, ash and sycamore; the shrub layer includes hawthorn, elder, field maple, guelder-rose and dogwood. This, in turn, supports a huge diversity of birds – sparrowhawks are one of the star birds of prey here. Six species of tit have also been recorded. Bats have also been seen, and you might spot wildflowers like red campion, skullcap and more unusual species. Out in the wet meadows, flora and fauna are both thriving, thanks to grazing. A good variety of butterflies occur, including common blue, meadow brown, large and small skippers, small heath and gatekeeper.

Environmental designation

Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI)